Description
This collection of interviews, conducted by the Office of Student Affairs in 1986, was used to produce Sixty Years of Achievement, a documentary film celebrating the University of Miami’s 60th Anniversary. The tapes contain over sixty hours of footage that do not appear in the documentary, and cover topics as disparate as the founding of the university, campus life during the 1920s, WWII, and student activism during the turbulent 1960s and early 70s. Many of the interviews move beyond campus concerns, using the University as a window to understanding South Florida’s history more broadly. Dennis Gaffney, a former University of Miami Office of Student Affairs employee, conducted most of the interviews.

List of Interviews
Below is a finding aid for the University of Miami 60th Anniversary Collection. Each entry is listed by tape number and by interviewee name. Many of the interviews are long and consist of multiple tapes. Descriptions of each tape are also provided, often listing important people, institutions, dates, and events that are mentioned in the interview.

Also included in the interview descriptions are the interview lengths, the formats in which the interviews exist, and whether or not the library has a release forms for specific interviews.

We are currently involved in efforts to secure release forms for all oral history materials. If for some reason a release form does not exist for a given interview, that interview can not be made available to the public. Researchers who need to access such materials should contact us so that we can prioritize our efforts to secure these forms.

Tape # 1

Marjorie Stoneman Douglas Interview (Part 1)
Description: Marjory Stoneman Douglas speaks on Miami from 1915 until just after WWII. Special attention is given to the founding of the University of Miami. Among the individuals mentioned are George Merrick, Bowman Ashe, Franklin Harris, Marion I. Manly, William Jennings Bryan, Winston Churchill and Robert Frost. Also mentioned is the use of the University grounds as a training facility for British airmen. Towards the end of the tape, Ms. Douglas begins to address the topic of environmental conservation.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 2

Marjorie Stoneman Douglas Interview (Part 2)
Description: Marjory Stoneman Douglas recalls vague memories of a “revolution” at UM which may have involved a rivalry between Dr. Pearson (then president of UM) and Walden Smith (of the Marine Lab). Next she speaks about the sense of pride that students at UM had in their school, and about the notion of building the University into an intellectual center between two continents. Victor Andreas and Ralph Bellaunde (both former students at UM) are mentioned in this regard. Finally, Ms. Douglas discusses the Everglades from the early conservation efforts of herself and others, to the present day. The topics of canalization, drainage, pollution from dairy farmers, sugar planting and the effects of these factors on local rainfall are all discussed, as are current efforts at environmental legislation. Important people mentioned by Ms. Douglas include Governor Bob Graham, Arthur Marshall, Johnny Jones and Jerry Parker.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 3

Marjorie Stoneman Douglas Interview (Part 3)
Description: Marjory Stoneman Douglas speaks briefly about the Friends of the Library, the Hurricane of 1926 and the Great Depression. She then recounts her WWI experiences when she worked overseas as a correspondent for American Red Cross publicity divisions. She then speaks about her time as an assistant editor on the Miami Herald, and her subsequent career as a freelance journalist. Ms. Douglas describes life in Miami in the early days, and mentions the city’s potential to become a dynamic “gateway city” that links two continents together. Finally, she returns to the topic of conservation and the fate of the Florida panther.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 4

Marjorie Stoneman Douglas Interview (Part 4)
Description: Marjory Stoneman Douglas speaks on the founding of the Everglades National Park, concentrating on its impressive bird population, the impact of water management, and the problem of mosquitoes.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 36 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 5

Henry King Stanford Interview (Part 1)
Description:The video begins with 23 minutes of film showing members of H.K. Stanford’s family on an outing. From there, the video moves to an interview with H.K. Stanford, where he discusses his reasons for coming to the University of Miami during the Civil Rights era and elaborates on his vision for the institution.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 6

Henry King Stanford Interview (Part 2)
Description: Henry King Stanford discusses his goal of building “Towers of Academic Excellence” while he was president of the University of Miami. Among the programs included in this discussion are the School of Music, the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences and the School of Medicine. He also delves into his relationship with the UM faculty, his proudest accomplishments, his greatest disappointments, and his reasons for leaving UM in 1982. Finally, he begins to dwell on his life after retirement.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 7

Henry King Stanford Interview (Part 3)
Description:Henry King Stanford talks about the future of the University of Miami, which he sees achieving the status of the preeminent Inter-American University of the Hemisphere. He talks briefly about appointments made at the University during his tenure, and then moves on to a discussion about Athletics, including the football and basketball programs. He then moves on to a discussion of the University’s ties both to the community and abroad, specifically to the Bahamas. Finally, Dr. Stanford dwells on his own personal feelings towards the city and the University.

Format:U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 8

Henry King Stanford Interview (Part 4)
Description: Henry King Stanford talks about the financial limitations of the University of Miami in the early 60’s and describes some of the major fund raising campaigns initiated to remedy these problems. He then moves on to discuss the protest movements of the 60’s and their impact on UM. Notable in this discussion are Dr. Stanfords recollection of African American, Women and Disabled student groups, as well as a recounting of a Vietnam protest involving 5000 students. Important names mentioned in this interview are Rd. Theadore Gibson, Roxie Boulton, Police Chief Bill Kimbro and Miami lawyer, Harold Long.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 9

Henry King Stanford Interview (Part 5)
Description:Dr. Henry King Stanford continues his discussion of UM during the protest era of the 1960’s. He mentions a brief encounter with Abbie Hoffman, and then talks about the differences between students in the 60’s and students “today.” He ends his discussion with some comments about his personal politics. Important names mentioned in this interview include Abbie Hoffman, “Bull” Connor, Governor Barnett and James Meredith.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 10

Henry King Stanford Interview (Part 6)
Description:This entire tape is dedicated to video footage of Dr. Henry King Stanford’s beautiful Georgia home.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 38 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 11

Frank Smathers Interview (Part 1)
Description:Frank Smathers, longtime member of UM’s Board of Trustees, speaks about life in Miami from his arrival in 1919 through the 1950s. Topics of discussion include the land boom of the early 1920s, Smather’s college education (including his time at the University of North Carolina, and his graduation from the UM Law School), the distinguished men and women that comprised UM’s Board of Trustees in the 1950s (when Smathers joined), and the University’s financial trouble during these years.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 30 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 12

Frank Smathers Interview (Part 2)
Description: Frank Smathers elaborates on the character of the first 3 presidents of the University, and their impact on the institution. He then reflects on the “Sun Tan U” reputation of the school and shares his concerns for the University’s “liberal” student body publications. Finally, he talks about the future of the University, which he thinks is limited by finances, and talks about the evolution of the Board of Trustees over the years.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 13

Frank Smathers Interview (Part 3)
Description: This tape contains no useful interview material. It is just a restatement of the questions Frank Smathers answered for editing purposes. There is also footage of a Miami related play towards the end of the tape.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 36 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 14

Charlton Tebeau Interview (Part 1)
Description: Dr. Tebeau talks about his reasons for coming to UM in 1939. He discusses the University’s humble beginnings and the boost WWII gave to its development. He then begins a discussion about the history of the institution, including the vision of the University’s founders, the effects of the end of Miami’s land boom, and the impact of the 1926 hurricane.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 15

Charlton Tebeau Interview (Part 2)
Description:Dr. Tebeau talks about the University’s first 3 presidents and their impact on the institution. He talks of the importance of the San Sebastian property to the school’s development, the WWII years and their impact on faculty and staff, and the use of climate for advertising, which leads to the “Sun Tan U” nickname. Dr. Tebeau then talks about the protest movements of the 1960s, and the slow desegregation of the school. He reflects on his experiences while teaching a course on African-American history, and about the coming of the first African-American teachers to UM.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 16

Charlton Tebeau Interview (Part 3)
Description: Dr. Tebeau concludes his discussion of African-American instructors at the University by mentioning the advent of Dr. Whittington Johnson to the University in 1969. He then reflects on his personal feelings towards the University. Finally, he discusses several topics that he failed to include in his history of the University, including the development of the Zoology Department and the development of the various campus “centers,” such as the Guidance Center.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 28 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 17

Charlton Tebeau Interview (Part 4)
Description:FG Walton Smith talks about his early life in England, his broad background in the sciences, and his schooling at the University of London, Princeton and Stanford. He then relates the circumstances that brought him to the University of Miami in 1939 (marriage, WWII), and the difficulties of building a Marine Science school from scratch; an endeavor that required him to learn how to be an administrator and a fund raiser. FG Walton Smith talks about Naval Research grants as well as the fund raising efforts of Dante Fascell on behalf of the Marine Science department and its work in conservation.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 18

F.G. Walton Smith Interview (Part 1)
Description: FG Walton Smith continues his discussion of the Marine Science School at UM, concentrating on the physical expansion of facilities, and the various projects that brought prestige for the school. Among these were deep sea drilling efforts, the Mole Hole project, and others. He also discusses the development of the school’s meteorology program.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 41 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 19

F.G. Walton Smith Interview (Part 2)
Description: This tape opens with FG Walton Smith commenting on what he calls the “cheap publicity” of the war years. He then speaks about the founding of International Oceanographic Foundation. Originally created in an effort to establish a marine aquarium on Virginia Key, the foundation turned its attentions toward a the marine museum, Planet Ocean, when other developers won the contract for what became the Miami Seaquarium. Dr. Smith mentions Charles Crandon’s involvement in these endeavors. FG Walton Smith also discusses his forced retirement from the University, the financial problems of the International Oceanographic Foundation in the 1980s, and the eventual partnership of the University of Miami and the Foundation. Dr. Smith ends the interview with a few personal reflections on the University.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 20

Margaret Mustard Interview
Description:Margaret Mustard talks about her early years at the University of Miami as a student in the late 1930s, and her later career as a faculty member (starting in 1945). She remembers the old Anastasia building, comments on Dr. Ashe, and the effect of WWII on the campus. She then speaks about her time as a researcher at South Campus where she studied agriculture and pharmacology. After South Campus closed down, she served a brief stint as a Jr. Administrator, and then returned to her research and teaching duties – this time in botany. She ends her interview with a few personal reflections on the University of Miami.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 30 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 21

Walt Kichefski Interview (Part 1)
Description:Mr. Kichefski speaks about the University of Miami from his first day as a student on January 14, 1936. After talking about the process of being scouted for the football team, Mr. Kichefski discusses the importance of the athletic department to the school and the building of the Hecht Athletic Center. He also dwells on his more recent work for the athletic department as a fund raiser.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 41 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 22

Walt Kichefski Interview (Part 2)
Description:Mr. Kichefski continues his discussion of UM by dwelling on the progress it has made over the years, and by talking about the board of trustees. He then discusses other aspects of UM’s athletic program, including tennis and baseball.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 28 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 23

Fernando Bellaunde Interview
Description: Fernando Bellaunde discusses the careers of his father, Rafael Bellaunde (Mexican Ambassador) and his uncle, Victor Andres Bellaunde (Chilean Ambassador), both of who were intimately involved with the University of Miami since the 1920s. He then speaks briefly about President Ashe, his interest in a Spanish-American institute, and the historic vision for the University of Miami, as well as his career as President of Peru from 1963 – 198\68.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 30 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 24

Nonexistent

Tape # 25

Riis Owre Interview (Part 1)
Description: Riis Owre recounts his long history at the University of Miami. He speaks about the University’s “primitive” conditions in the 1930s, about Dr. Ashe’s exceptional leadership and personality, and about his involvement in the establishment of the UM Graduate School (for which he served as dean for many years). He also speaks frankly about the limitations of the University.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 26

Riis Owre Interview (Part 2)
Description: Riis Owre speaks about the students that flocked to UM after WWII, calling them “the most serious bunch” of students ever to attend the school. He talks about the effects of these students on UM financially, and about the importance of a good library to support the University’s graduate program. He then dwells on the difficulties and realities of being a high level administrator at the University of Miami and criticizes the role of athletics, which he considers detrimental to the mission of a true University.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 27

Riis Owre Interview (Part 3)
Description: Owre briefly speaks about UM VP, Dr. Johns and about President Stanford’s administration. The rest of the tape is dedicated to footage taken from the University of Miami Metro Rail station, and to pictures taken at the University of Miami in the 1930s.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 9 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 28

Riis Owre Interview (Part 4)
Description: Riis Owre talks about being Graduate Dean and making decisions that were sometimes seen as controversial. He also speaks frankly about university faculty, which he feels is sometimes under qualified. He talks about the importance of a curriculum that includes the arts. He also shares his vision of how the University of Miami should develop in the future. He finishes his comments with a frank discussion of Dr. Pearson, a few comments on Dr. Stanford.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 29

1920s Alumni Interviews (Part 1)
Description: Arva Parks and graduates from the University’s first years meet at the site of the old Anastasia Building, and talk about the early days of the school. Among the graduates is Francis Novgataling, UM’s first registered student. The interviews are a bit unfocused and very general, but there is mention of an old Miami bootlegger called Jimmy the Hunchback. Francis also mentions the famous actor, Joe Cotton.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 41 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 30

1920s Alumni Interviews (Part 2)
Description:Arva Parks and graduates from the University’s first years meet at the site of the old Anastasia Building, and talk about the early days of the school. The interviews are very general and unfocused, but there is brief mention of blackouts and German U – Boats off the coast of Miami during WWII. Some of the graduates include Francis Novgataling, Arthur Darlow, Austin Younts, Arva Parks, and Thelma Peters.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 39 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 31

1920s Alumni Interviews (Part 3)
Description:Graduates from the University’s first years talk about the early days of the school. The interviews are somewhat general and unfocused. Among the graduates interviewed are Austin Younts, Francis Novgataling, Kathrine Whickham, Kay Courtney, Alan Cross, and Clara DuPuis.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 39 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 32

1920s Alumni Interviews (Part 4)
Description: Graduates from the University’s first years talk about the early days of the school. The graduates recall life in Miami during the big boom, when such famous bands as Jan Garber’s, Paul Whittman’s, and Blue Steel would play at the country club to attract real estate buyers. They also recall William Jennings Bryan’s activity in early Miami. The graduates then discuss their Depression Era professors at the University of Miami, as well as the Depression’s effect on the school’s culture. They also dwell on Dr. Ashe’s generosity and vision and on the importance of the football team in terms of school pride.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 38 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 33

1920s Alumni Interviews (Part 5)
Description: Graduates from the University’s first years talk about the early days of the school. The graduates talk about school dances, competitions, and traditions. They also talk about fund raising to build the Rhodney Burnheim stadium, which would eventually become the Orange Bowl.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 34

1920s Alumni Interviews (Part 6)
Description:Graduates from the University’s first years talk about the early days of the school. The graduates talk about the founding of Iron Arrow, the IBIS, the Winter Institute of Literature, and a few of the professors and presidents of the University of Miami.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 43 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 35

1920s Alumni Interviews (Part 7)
Description:Graduates from the University’s first years talk about the early days of the school. Most of the tape is just silent footage of the graduates walking around campus, but Gaffney does conduct an on the spot interview with Dick Palmeroy, who talks about alumni associations, bootleggers, and the University in general.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 25 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 36

Nonexistent

Tape # 37

Nonexistent

Tape # 38

Nonexistent

Tape # 39

Norman Kenyon Interview
Description:Dr. Norman Kenyon talks about his career as a medical student at UM, starting in 1952 (first class). He dwells on student life at the fledgling medical school, and about the superlative training he received. He also talks about the medical school’s relationship with Jackson Hospital. Finally, he dwells on the characteristics of today’s med students, and on the school’s impact on the community.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 39 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 40

Nonexistent

Tape # 41

James McLamore Interview
Description: Chairman of the Board of Trustees, James McLamore, talks about President Foote and his program to build a reputation for academic excellence at the University of Miami. He also talks about the apparent success of the $400,000,000 fund raising campaign, and the uses for that money, including the building of new Physics and Geology buildings. Finally, he muses on what the University has meant to him personally.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 29 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 42

James McLamore Interview
Description: Chairman of the Board of Trustees, James McLamore, talks about his days as an executive for the Burger King Corporation, and his invitation to join the UM Board of Trustees in 1973 (becoming Chairman in 1980). He speaks of his love for the community and his belief in South Florida. He talks about the miraculous fund raising campaign, which in only 1 year raised $219,000,000 for the University, and discusses some of the details of running a fund raising campaign.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 30 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 43

Tad Foote Interview (Part 1)
Description: President Foote talks about his early days in Missouri, and about his vision for the University of Miami. He talks about the notion of a Pan-American Institute, about the G.I. Bill and its important impact on the University, and about the importance of diversity. He also speaks of the legacy of President Ashe and the accomplishments of Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Jim McLamore.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 35 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 44

Tad Foote Interview (Part 2)
Description: President Foote talks about the legacy he would like to leave at the University and about the University’s relationship to the community.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 12 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 45

Connie Weldon Interview
Description:Assistant Dean of the School of Music, Connie Weldon, talks about her early years in Miami, when she became interested in orchestral music through the University of Miami’s fledgeling orchestra. She talks about her subsequent career as a student in UM’s music school, where she studied the tuba in what she calls a “warm and caring” environment. Weldon remembers Bertha Foster, who’s conservatory became the foundation of UM’s School of Music. She remembers the “cardboard college,” and the wonderful faculty she worked with. She briefly mentions her stint on the Boston Pops with Arthur Fiedler, and comments on the rise and fall of the Miami Philharmonic. Weldon also mentions Arnold and Maria (?) Volpe, and talks about the innovative programs offered by the UM School of Music, including music industry, music engineering, music therapy, music theater, and the Jazz program.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 26 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 46

Nonexistent

Tape # 47

Harold Long Interview
Description: Miami lawyer, Harold Long, discusses his experiences as a UM undergraduate student (1964-68), as well as his days as a student at UM’s School of Law (1968-71). Harold Long was among the founders of United Black Students, and served as that institution’s president until 1968. Mr. Long describes a sit-in conducted by himself and 12 other students, who demanded that UM institute financial and educational opportunities for black students. They also demanded that the University aggressively recruit African-American students and professors. Although arrested for their non-violent protest, UBS’s achieved many of their goals, in part through the efforts of Henry King Stanford, who long describes as a fair but masterful negotiator. Mr. Long ends his interview by reflecting on the conditions of African-American students then as opposed to now.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 35 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 48

Bunn Gautier Interview
Description:Trustee Bunn Gautier talks about the University under the leadership of President Foote and Jim McLamore, and about the University’s fund raising projects. He briefly talks about Jim Knight and about the City of Miami Hospital.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 31 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 49

Dante Fascell Interview
Description: Congressman Dante Fascell recalls his days as a University of Miami student during the 1930s, first as an undergraduate student, and then as a student at UM’s School of Law.He speaks about the modest beginnings of the University, the poverty of many of its early students, survival during the Great Depression, and his decision to get involved in politics after WWII. He then moves on to a general discussion on education, and the impact of the University on Miami’s community.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 41 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 50

Alvin Snyder Interview (Part 1)
Description:The head of USIA’sWorldNet, Alvin Snyder, talks about his experiences at UM’s school of communications, from which he graduated in 1958. He talks about the impact such professors as Paul Nagel and Sydney Head had on him, and about the quality of one on one instruction he received as a student. He remarks on the incredible growth of the school in 25 years and about the enthusiasm of the students on campus. He also talks about Miami as being the #1 growth area in the country, and about its importance in the international community.

The last 10 minutes, of the tape are an interview with an unidentified woman who attended UM in 1934. She speaks about the early faculty and students and about the Depression.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 39 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 51

Alvin Snyder Interview (Part 2)
Description: Alvin Snyder, head of USIA’s WorldNet, is interviewed for “Straight Talk.” Here he recounts his life story, beginning with his time as a UM student, his subsequent job as a copyboy at New York’s CBS studios, and his rise to becoming producer for CBS radio and television. He mentions meeting or being inspired by such notables as Lowell Thomas, Ed Murrow, and Prescot Anderson. He also speaks about world communications in the context of the Chernobyl disaster, and answers challenges to the notion that we have indeed become a “global village” where secrets are not kept by the world’s governments. Finally he dwells on World Net (1st global television network, run by the U.S.), and answers question about its goals and its programming.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 34 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 52

Alvin Snyder Interview (Part 3)
Description:Alvin Snyder, head of USIA’s WorldNet, is interviewed for “Straight Talk.” Here dwells on World Net (1st global television network, run by the U.S.), and answers question about its goals and its programming. He also spends some time discussing the medium of radio versus television.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 41 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 53

Austin Younts Interview (Part 1)
Description:Austin Younts reflects on the impact the University of Miami has had on his life. He talks about such early UM professors as Holsworth, Foster, West, and Lowell, and mentions William Jennings Bryan and his involvement in early Miami. He remembers his scholarship, which consisted of working his way through college as a dog handler at the race tracks, and he recalls the successes and failures of the sports program in the early years. He finishes the tape by talking about some infamous community members, and the development of UM’s “school spirit” in the early years.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 36 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 54

Austin Younts Interview (Part 2)
Description: Austin Younts recounts his first day at the University of Miami in 1926, after giving a brief biographical sketch of his life before he came to Miami. He comments on his expectations upon arriving at the University, talks about the campus social life, and reflects on Dr. Bowman Ashe. He then talks about the Hurricane of 1926 and his stint as a driver for the Red Cross after the storm. Finally, he talks about the Great Depression, his time in the Navy, his return to the University after the war, and sketchy details about his life since.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 55

Larry Catha Interview (Part 1)
Description: Larry Catha recounts his week long journey from Kentwood, Louisiana to Miami in 1925. While here he worked as a truck driver and in RR construction until the Hurricane of 1926. In 1926 he chanced into a football scholarship at UM and, after kicking off the first ball at the school’s first game, went on to become one of the Hurricane’s star player in its first 4 years. Catha details some of his finer moments on the team, and gives valuable descriptions of UM’s campus and student life in these early years. He mentions Chief Osceola’s presence at many of the first year football games, the naming of the football team, the building of UM’s first stadium, and begins to tell how he presented the first and only football used at Miami’s first game in 1926 to the coaching staff of Miami’s then current football team (coach Schnellenberger).

Format: U-Matic, Length: 44 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 56

Larry Catha Interview (Part 2)
Description: Larry Catha recounts how he presented the first and only football used at Miami’s first game in 1926 to the coaching staff of Miami’s then current football team (coach Schnellenberger). He ends the interview by mentioning some of the few players from UM’s first football team who were still alive at the time of the interview, and by talking a little about how they were honored by the University.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 28 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 57

Doris Kromer Interview
Description: Doris Kromer recounts her time at UM in the late 20s and early 30s. She gives some interesting details concerning UM’s student life. The last 7 minutes, of the tape contain part of an interview with an unidentified student who attended the University in the 1980s.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 30 minutes, (+7 minutes,) Release: No

Tape # 58

John Allen Interview (Part 1)
Description: John Allen attended the University of Miami in its first years. On this tape he talks extensively of the Pan American programs initiated by the university under the leadership of Bowman Ashe, Victor and Rafael Bellaunde, and Theodore Dickenson. He gives detailed descriptions of two different conferences (on in 1931 and the other in 1933), and also talks a bit about George Merrick and his involvement with the school and students.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 42 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 59

John Allen Interview (Part 2)
Description:John Allen attended the University of Miami in its first years. On this tape he talks extensively about student interest and involvement in the school, focusing on such personalities as Dr. Bowman Ashe, the Bellaundes and others. Much of his focus centers around the Pan American interest of these notables, and the student involvment in the University’s Pan American efforts. Other important names mentioned include Elihu Root and Dr. Barrett.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 38 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 60

John Allen Interview (Part 3)
Description:John Allen attended the University of Miami in its first years. On this tape he talks about his coursework with Ida Clyde Clark (who taught journalism), and about what the University has meant to him in terms of spirit, training, and his career.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 22 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 61

Ione Wright Interview (Part 1)
Description: Educated in Berkeley, Dr. Ione Wright was invited to teach Latin American history at UM in 1946. Although only a guest lecturer at first, Dr. Wright eventually received tenure and taught at the University until 1972. She also served as editor for the publication produced by the Center for Advanced International Studies. On this tape, Dr. Wright remembers her years at the University of Miami, especially her experiences teaching foreign students.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 62

Ione Wright Interview (Part 2)
Description: Ione Wright talks about the 1964 decision to publish the Journal of Inter American Studies at the University. Mosel Harvey was hired as director, and she was asked to edit the magazine. Dr. Wright speaks with pride about the publication, citing the contributions of UM professors, Bob Levine and Jaime Suchlicki (one of her former students). Dr. Wright also speaks of the anti-Latin American studies attitude of many of the university administrators immediately preceding Dr. Foote.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 63

Ione Wright Interview (Part 3)
Description: Dr. Ione Wright talks about her early days in Miami as a young girl starting in 1914. She muses on her days at the University of Miami in 1946, remembering the influx of students that arrived as a result of the G.I. Bill. She also shares some thoughts on President’s Ashe and Pearson. Dr. Wright then gives some brief thoughts on the University of Miami during the protest era of the 60s and 70s.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 64

Jim Kroger Interview (Part 1)
Description: Jim Kroger talks about the early history of the University of Miami, covering such topics as the leadership of President Ashe, its economic struggles, the founding of Iron Arrow, the university’s growth during WWII, and the relationship between the school and its alumni. He ends his discussion with some personal thoughts about what the university has meant to him and some thoughts on the people he met because of it.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 65

Jim Kroger Interview (Part 2)
Description: Jim Kroger came from KY to Miami as a child. In this interview, he talks about his early days in the city, recalling such events as the Hurricane of 1926, the Great Depression and the earlier Miami land bust, William Jennings Bryan’s stint as a speaker for George Merrick, and his career as a student at the University of Miami. He also talks about his radio business after graduation, which was responsible for installing the first sound system at the Orange Bowl.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 40 minutes, Release: No

Tape # 66

Jimmy Johnson Interview
Description: Jimmy Johnson gives a blow by blow analysis of the 1986 (?) football season. He also gives some insights on then Miami Hurricane quarterback, Vinnie Testaverde.

Format: U-Matic, Length: 37 minutes, Release: No